Your favorite spring training clichés, translated and explained

Baseball tends to lend itself to more clichés than a direct-to-DVD movie, and with good reason. It starts here, in spring training.

Of course, the modern athlete is more in-tune than ever with understanding the ramifications of his or her words, meaning almost every soundbite will include at least one cliché.

Translation: “You need to calm the hell down. It’s spring training.”

It’s pretty awesome when you can hit home runs like Eric Thames, but also get on base enough and be fast enough to steal bases like Jose Altuve. Altuve was just six homers away from going 30-30 this past season, so in short, it’s awesome to be Jose Altuve.

So, can Ramirez do it? Let’s look at some historic precedent. Ramirez is going to be playing his Age 34 season this year. Nobody older than 32 has gone 30-30, which makes sense given that speed is one of the first tools to erode with age. Not even Barry Bonds, who stole quite a few bags before he became the size of a small mountain, was able to go 30-30 after his 33rd birthday. Ramirez was 24 when he had his 30-30 campaign in 2008. He last stole 20 bases in 2012, and hasn’t been in double-digits since before signing with the Red Sox. You can see where this is going.

Sources: Nationals first-round pick Seth Romero was sent home from spring training this morning. A club spokesman said Romero violated club policy. Unclear as to how long he will be gone or the specific policy violated.

The Nationals looked past those issues to make him the 25th pick in last year’s MLB Draft, projecting that he could be ready for the majors as early as this season, though he finished 2017 at short-season Single-A. He is considered among the top handful of prospects on a team that has been lacking in left-handed pitching.

According to the Post, how long Romero will be exiled isn’t clear, but as of now he isn’t taking part in spring training.

Finally, DRS uses run expectancy to determine how many runs a saved base at a position is worth: for a shortstop, this factor is around .76. To convert from bases saved to runs saved or bases allowed to runs allowed, multiply bases saved or bases allowed by that factor. In this example, Simmons is responsible for .9375 times .76 or .71 runs saved if he makes the play, or -.50 times .76 or -.38 runs if he can’t make the play, and allows the runner advance to second.

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